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Commissions

Commission - Autumn version of 'Hope Is All We Have.'
Interested in commissioning an artwork?
There are several steps in commissioning an artwork.
1. Image - previous clients have requested similar artwork created from images I've already created. This allows adjustments to the colour palette, size etc to suite their surroundings. Other clients have specific images in mind, for example, landscapes, still life, etc. It is useful to provide as many images as you can of what you want.
Commission- London

2. Dimensions of an artwork. - art is at its very best when it is designed for a specific space. Measure the wall space you want the artwork to hang. An image of the space is very useful to an artist. Knowing how the painting is lit - where windows are etc. Canvases vary in shape and sizes and some paintings work well as a diptych or triptych. (2 or 3 canvases that make up one image.)
3. Colour palette - once again, light has a strong influence on colour. It is also important to colour match the items and decoration you have in your home, unless, that is, you're about to have a complete revamp. Clients have taken images of their room in order to portray their preferred colour palette.
Why do I use oil colours? Oil colours provide a richness and depth of colour that no other media come close to. Multiple layering of colours gives a luminosity to the artwork, this allows colours to shine through colours, which realistically mimics the colours we see naturally.
Commission - Lincolnshire

4. Pricing. - prices vary according to materials used and time spent. Once an image and dimensions are agreed on, the artwork can be priced. A 25% non refundable deposit will be required and full payment will need to made, as well as the costs for p&p before delivery.
Take a look at my work for sale on my website, this will give you an idea of the prices I charge.
5. Updates - I like to keep my clients updated on the progress of their artwork, so I keep a visual diary which I can share with them.
6. Time frames - as long as there's not a waiting list, (I generally work on several pieces at once due to canvas drying times.) most artworks take anywhere between 3 weeks - 3 months to produce. This again is dependent on the complexity or simplicity of the artwork. As I work in oils, drying time is also a factor.